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Utopia Talk / Politics / Hans Christian Heg
Rugian
Member
Wed Jun 24 09:00:20
"Hans Christian Heg (December 21, 1829 – September 20, 1863) was a Norwegian American journalist, anti-slavery activist, politician and soldier, best known for leading the Scandinavian 15th Wisconsin Volunteer Regiment in the American Civil War. He died of the wounds he received at the Battle of Chickamauga."

Background

Heg was born at Haugestad in the community of Lierbyen in Lier, Buskerud, Norway on December 21, 1829. He was the eldest of the four children of an innkeeper. His father, Even Hansen Heg (1790–1850), moved his family to America in 1840, settling in the Muskego Settlement in Wisconsin. Hans Heg was eleven years old when his family arrived in Muskego. He soon earned a reputation for himself as being a gifted boy.[2]

At twenty years old, lured by the discovery of gold in the Sacramento Valley, he and three friends joined the army of "Forty-Niners". He spent the next two years prospecting for gold in California. Upon the death of his father, he returned to the Muskego area in 1851. He married Gunhild Einong, daughter of a Norwegian immigrant.

Heg became a rising young politician who found slavery abhorrent. He became an ardent member of the Free Soil Party.[3] Heg was a major in the 4th Wisconsin Militia and served as Wisconsin State Prison Commissioner. He was the first Norwegian-born candidate elected statewide in Wisconsin.

He soon joined the recently formed Republican Party. He was an outspoken anti-slavery activist and a leader of Wisconsin's Wide Awakes, an anti-slave catcher militia.[4][5] During this time, he sheltered Sherman Booth, who was made a federal fugitive after inciting a mob to rescue an escaped slave.

In 1860, Heg was elected commissioner of the state prison in Waupun, and served there for two years. Heg spearheaded many reforms to the prison, believing that prisons should be used to "reclaim the wandering and save the lost."[6]

Military service

With the outbreak of the Civil War, Heg was appointed by Governor Alexander Randall as colonel of the 15th Wisconsin Volunteer Regiment. Appealing to all young "Norsemen," he said, "the government of our adopted country is in danger. It is our duty as brave and intelligent citizens to extend our hands in defense of the cause of our Country and of our homes."[7] The 15th Wisconsin was called the Scandinavian Regiment since its soldiers were almost all immigrants from Norway, with some from Denmark and Sweden. It was the only all Scandinavian regiment in the Union Army. On 8 October 1862, Colonel Heg led his regiment into its first action at the Battle of Perryville. Despite being under fire while being driven back several miles by the enemy, the 15th Wisconsin suffered few casualties and no fatalities. However, one of those hurt was Colonel Heg, who was injured when his horse fell.

Heg commanded the regiment during the Battle of Stones River. In response to his conduct at Stones River, Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans placed Heg in command of the newly formed 3rd Brigade of the 1st Division, XX Corps, Army of the Cumberland, on May 1, 1863.

On September 19, 1863, Heg led his brigade at the Battle of Chickamauga, where he was mortally wounded. Heg "was shot through the bowels and died the next day." [8] Upon hearing of Heg's death, Rosecrans expressed regret, saying he had intended to promote Heg to brigadier general. Heg was one of three Wisconsinite colonels killed in combat during the Civil War.

Heg was buried at the Norway Lutheran Church Cemetery near Wind Lake, Wisconsin.[9][10]

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Christian_Heg
Rugian
Member
Wed Jun 24 09:02:56
Fast forward to today:

"!Protesters allegedly attack senator, topple statues outside Wisconsin State Capitol

Wednesday, June 24 2020
ABC News Radio
Skyhobo/iStockSkyhobo/iStock
By MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News

(MADISON, Wis.) -- Turmoil unfolded outside the Wisconsin State Capitol on Tuesday night as protesters allegedly attacked a state senator, smashed windows and toppled two historic statues.

Demonstrations began in downtown Madison earlier Tuesday following the arrest of a Black protest organizer, who police say walked into a restaurant while speaking through a bullhorn and holding a baseball bat. Devonere Johnson, 28, was taken into custody Tuesday afternoon but allegedly broke free from the back of a squad car. He was tackled to the ground as he attempted to escape, according to the incident report from the Madison Police Department.

Two officers suffered minor injuries during the alleged incident, while Johnson sustained abrasions to his arms and leg. Johnson has been tentatively charged with disorderly conduct while armed, resisting arrest and attempted escape, police said.

That night, protesters chanting for Johnson's release tore down the "Forward" statue and dragged it away from its base at the steps of the Wisconsin State Capitol, according to Madison ABC affiliate WKOW-TV. The bronze allegorical statue, which is more than 100 years old, depicts a female figure standing on the prow of a boat, with her right hand stretched out while her left clasps the American flag.

A short time later, the same group pulled down a statue of Col. Hans Christian Heg and threw it into a nearby lake, according to WKOW. Heg was a Norwegian immigrant and abolitionist who served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He led the predominately-Scandinavian 15th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment into battle against the Confederate Army until his death at Chickamauga in 1863.

Meanwhile, glass windows were smashed at the Tommy G. Thompson Center, a state government building named after a Republican politician who served as governor of Wisconsin from 1987 to 2001.

At some point during the night, WKOW's crew reportedly came across state Sen. Tim Carpenter who claimed he had been assaulted by protesters for taking a photo of them. Carpenter, a Democrat, then collapsed and the news crew called 911 for an ambulance. His condition was unknown, according to WKOW.

ABC News has reached out to Carpenter for comment as well as police.

In response to a WKOW reporter's post on Twitter, Carpenter tweeted Wednesday morning about the alleged incident, saying he was punched and kicked in the head, neck and ribs by several people."

http://www...utside-Wisconsin-State-Capitol
Rugian
Member
Wed Jun 24 09:03:13
I'd love to hear jergul's take on this one.
Nimatzo
iChihuaha
Wed Jun 24 10:28:21
We have all accepted collateral damage in the form of dead babies and friendly fire killing our own. Let us not hold rag tag bands of wannabe insurgents destroying property to a higher standard.
TJ
Member
Wed Jun 24 10:28:55
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zGlSmmOUT8

There goes her career.
patom
Member
Wed Jun 24 11:09:49
Is anyone defending the actions of rabble here?
Rugian
Member
Wed Jun 24 11:11:56
Patom

Its more of an "I told you so" moment. The mob was never going to stop with Confederate statues.

This is about erasing American history.

Nimatzo
iChihuaha
Wed Jun 24 14:41:01
Has it been established that the insurgents knew what they were breaking?
jergul
large member
Wed Jun 24 14:54:44
An unfortunate friendly fire incident.
TJ
Member
Wed Jun 24 15:36:08
It seems obvious to me when they loot and burn down black owned businesses and destroy pro black monuments that their interest isn't in black lives.
patom
Member
Wed Jun 24 15:49:46
Rugian, So the removal of a statue of someone I had never heard of has altered history? In fact I would venture to say that few if any outside Wisconsin or many of them inside Wisconsin ever heard of him or know his history.

He is however in the history books that cover the Civil War.
kargen
Member
Wed Jun 24 17:10:28
"Has it been established that the insurgents knew what they were breaking?"

That is the point. They do not care what they are breaking. If they gave a shit they would spend thirty seconds on google before deciding to bring down a statue. They simply have been given an excuse to tear shit up and they are taking it.

patom why are you so quick to dismiss the history of Wisconsin? Doesn't matter really if the rest of the world has heard of him he is/was important to Wisconsin. Even if he were just a local hero only the surrounding community had heard of it doesn't justify tearing down the statue.

The people that did it are criminals and idiots. If not stopped that becomes a dangerous combination.
Nimatzo
iChihuaha
Wed Jun 24 17:56:38
kargen
Well when emotions run high and things start breaking, most people do not pause to use their mindfulness apps, reflect and google stuff. But, sure some of them are rabble rouser, anarchist and other forms of asshats that want to break everything, it's not about it being America.
Y2A
Member
Wed Jun 24 20:06:20
abolitionists that shed blood to end slavery should be venerated.

P.S. these guys were WOKE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_Awakes
Paramount
Member
Thu Jun 25 01:36:12
Yes, we could regard this as collateral damage.
patom
Member
Thu Jun 25 04:32:20
kargan, statues are not history. Get rid of everyone of them and it won't change history.
jergul
large member
Thu Jun 25 05:01:11
Its cute how Trumptards assign mobs both sentience and premeditation.

A refreshing change from when the US military "helped" a mob "spontaniously" pull down statues of Sadam.

In the good old days before their heavy lift cranes needed full armour protection.

Kargen
Statues and monuments of historical import should and are curated by museums and similar institutions.

There are several places where monuments are protected as heritage sites.

Those are history. The rest are just mass produced kitch and 19-20th century public bling.

Moral of the story? The south will not rise again.
Rugian
Member
Thu Jun 25 05:19:39
"Those are history. The rest are just mass produced kitch and 19-20th century public bling."

Typical modernist idiocy. I bet your ideal city would consist of nothing but 1950s tower blocks due to their utilitarian value.

Cities and towns require a sense of civic pride and beauty which your Soviet mind cant even begin to comprehend.
jergul
large member
Thu Jun 25 05:36:00
Ruggy
We have regulations that protect constructions of historical or heritage import.

In fact, I know you have Federal, State and Municipal statutes for similar effect.

If you want a point, then point to protected monuments being harmed by demonstrators.

Then I will say "uffda, I hope repairing the monument will be inexpensive".
Rugian
Member
Thu Jun 25 07:04:48
Typical Soviet mentality. If there isnt an official government-issued decree to protect a piece of public art, then it's perfectly okay for a small group of radical extremists to destroy it.
Rugian
Member
Thu Jun 25 07:08:00
And lol at all the flat-out idiots in this thread talking about "friendly fire." Yes, it was an honest mistake to mistake this guy for a Confederate statue. The latter are very common in Wisconsin after all. Rofl
jergul
large member
Thu Jun 25 11:50:20
Ruggy
Its a pretty innocent form of civic vandalism. Your nation was founded on acts like this btw.
Nimatzo
iChihuaha
Thu Jun 25 12:12:24
Rugian
Unrealistic expectations on disorganized street gangs. They burned down stores owned by black people as well, was that also about destroying "America"? It could have been a copy cat attempt to feel part of whatever it is that is going. That is the problem I tried to convey with Peter Turchin's work, that these things take a life of their own and are difficult to control once they go off.
kargen
Member
Thu Jun 25 14:12:00
"kargan, statues are not history. Get rid of everyone of them and it won't change history."

They are representations and reminders of history. For some communities they are important for a variety of reasons. Historic value aside they are public works and destroying them is a crime.

"Statues and monuments of historical import should and are curated by museums and similar institutions."

That is a very narrow point of view. A monument in a park could strike interest in those that view it. They can be points of interest. They can be on the sight of something they are commemorating. They can be objects of local pride. The Memorial to the Children Victims of the War in Lidice is exactly where it belongs.
jergul
large member
Thu Jun 25 15:05:30
Kargen
We are compiling a list of momuments of historical note? Great! We now have 1

Of course it is a crime to destroy public property. Up to the government in question if they want to press charges, repair damaged monuments, or use the public land for some other purpose.
kargen
Member
Thu Jun 25 15:56:25
No we are not compiling a list. I am showing you how short sighted saying statues belong in museums is. Statues have meaning to the community. If the community decides that the statue no longer correctly represents the community there are avenues for removal.
Many of the people now bringing down statues are doing it for fun. They are not angry or supporting some cause. They are taking advantage and having a good time tearing shit up. You can tell just by observing the mood of the crowds. They get angry when someone tries to stop them and end their fun.
Statues torn down the first night in Atlanta I will give you was a part of a protest. Still illegal and if they catch who did it they should pick up the tab for damages. What is happening now, that isn't a protest that is just tearing shit up.
jergul
large member
Fri Jun 26 02:13:34
Kargen
If they have meaning for the community, then the monuments will be repaired and replaced and the community will treat episodes as criminal events worth investigating.

Children of Lidice a case in point. One of the statues was stolen. The case was heavily investigated. While the statue was not recovered, the missing monument was replaced after donations were collected for that purpose.
patom
Member
Fri Jun 26 04:45:51
Which community does a statue of Jefferson Davis or Robert E Lee have a singular uniting meaning?

Oh I'm sure there are gated communities in the South where black people dare not go or are denied residency. They would be united.
jergul
large member
Fri Jun 26 05:05:53
Statues in gated communities are also pretty well defended :).
kargen
Member
Fri Jun 26 13:56:52
"If they have meaning for the community, then the monuments will be repaired and replaced and the community will treat episodes as criminal events worth investigating."

Some can not be replaced as the artist that created them is no longer with us. That aside we are getting away from the point I was making that people are tearing things down not as a protest but for fun because they know they will get away with it. That is why there is no rhyme or reason to what statues or monuments they target.

I think President Trump's suggestion (haven't had the news on today so don't know if it is an executive order now) of ten years in prison is to harsh. Jail time for most probably isn't a good idea. Restitution for the damage they caused and a whole lot of community service could work though. Make then spend several days cleaning up the area they destroyed.
patom
Member
Fri Jun 26 14:20:58
Not sure if Trump or any President can write laws or set sentence guidelines for any crimes. That is the job of the Congress.
TJ
Member
Fri Jun 26 14:35:29
Trump can't, but he doesn't need to since such a law exists. Of course many laws have been ignored to date. If not federal the state decides action.

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/1361
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