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Utopia Talk / Politics / Trunp has protected the suburbs
Rugian
Member
Mon Oct 19 05:24:55
From garbage like this. Homeless people, drug addicts, crime, gang activity, and total anarchy.

This shit is an everyday occurence in Democratic-run cities. And now Biden has pledged to spread this filth to the entire country.

Anyone on this board who claims that they'd be okay with this state of affairs in their own community is a fucking liar. Deep down, you know this isnt how things are supposed to work. But this is what Democrats want.

----

Rampant shoplifting leads to another Walgreens closing in S.F.

Phil Matier
Oct. 18, 2020 Updated: Oct. 18, 2020 4 a.m.

After months of seeing its shelves repeatedly cleaned out by brazen shoplifters, the Walgreens at Van Ness and Eddy in San Francisco is getting ready to close.

“The last day is Nov. 11,” Walgreens spokesman Phil Caruso said.

The drugstore, which serves many older people who live in the Opera Plaza area, is the seventh Walgreens to close in the city since 2019.

“All of us knew it was coming. Whenever we go in there, they always have problems with shoplifters, ” said longtime customer Sebastian Luke, who lives a block away and is a frequent customer who has been posting photos of the thefts for months. The other day, Luke photographed a man casually clearing a couple of shelves and placing the goods into a backpack.

“I feel sorry for the clerks, they are regularly being verbally assaulted,” Luke said. “The clerks say there is nothing they can do. They say Walgreens’ policy is to not get involved. They don’t want anyone getting injured or getting sued, so the guys just keep coming in and taking whatever they want.”

For security reasons, Walgreens declined to provide details on their security policies, but Caruso did say that “the safety of our team members and customers is our top concern.”

A recent trip to the store revealed aisle after aisle of empty or near-empty shelves. Beauty supplies appear to be a favored target.

Most of the remaining products were locked behind plastic theft guards, which have become increasingly common at drugstores in recent years.

But at Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street, even the jugs of clothing detergent on display were looped with locked anti-theft cables.

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LOCAL // PHIL MATIER
Rampant shoplifting leads to another Walgreens closing in S.F.
Photo of Phil Matier
Phil Matier
Oct. 18, 2020 Updated: Oct. 18, 2020 4 a.m.
Comments
Pedestrains walk past the Walgreens on the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street on Monday, October 12, 2020 in San Francisco, Calif. The Walgreens at 790 Van Ness Avenue is scheduled to close on November 11.
Pedestrains walk past the Walgreens on the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street on Monday, October 12, 2020 in San Francisco, Calif. The Walgreens at 790 Van Ness Avenue is scheduled to close on November 11.
Photo: Lea Suzuki / The Chronicle
After months of seeing its shelves repeatedly cleaned out by brazen shoplifters, the Walgreens at Van Ness and Eddy in San Francisco is getting ready to close.

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“The last day is Nov. 11,” Walgreens spokesman Phil Caruso said.

The drugstore, which serves many older people who live in the Opera Plaza area, is the seventh Walgreens to close in the city since 2019.


“All of us knew it was coming. Whenever we go in there, they always have problems with shoplifters, ” said longtime customer Sebastian Luke, who lives a block away and is a frequent customer who has been posting photos of the thefts for months. The other day, Luke photographed a man casually clearing a couple of shelves and placing the goods into a backpack.

“I feel sorry for the clerks, they are regularly being verbally assaulted,” Luke said. “The clerks say there is nothing they can do. They say Walgreens’ policy is to not get involved. They don’t want anyone getting injured or getting sued, so the guys just keep coming in and taking whatever they want.”

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For security reasons, Walgreens declined to provide details on their security policies, but Caruso did say that “the safety of our team members and customers is our top concern.”

A recent trip to the store revealed aisle after aisle of empty or near-empty shelves. Beauty supplies appear to be a favored target.

Most of the remaining products were locked behind plastic theft guards, which have become increasingly common at drugstores in recent years.

But at Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street, even the jugs of clothing detergent on display were looped with locked anti-theft cables.


When a clerk was asked where all the goods had gone, he said, “Go ask the people in the alleys, they have it all.”

Homeless encampments are common in the neighborhood, including two just across Eddy Street.

No sooner had the clerk spoken than a man wearing a virus mask walked in, emptied two shelves of snacks into a bag, then headed back for the door.

As he walked past the checkout line, a customer called out, “Sure you don’t want a drink with that?”

Just across busy Van Ness and down a block, a competing CVS pharmacy was fully stocked.

The difference? The CVS had a security guard at the door.

“Up there, they are closer to the Tenderloin. It’s the Wild West,” said a CVS clerk who was standing with the security guard.

The homeless encampments and the thefts at the Walgreens were front and center at a neighborhood town hall at St. Mary’s Cathedral in March.

Police responded by placing two officers and a squad car outside the store at the corner of Eddy and Van Ness.

“Everyone was happy,” Luke said.

But as the pandemic shutdown dragged on, the officers were needed elsewhere. And a short time later, the thieves returned in full force.

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LOCAL // PHIL MATIER
Rampant shoplifting leads to another Walgreens closing in S.F.
Photo of Phil Matier
Phil Matier
Oct. 18, 2020 Updated: Oct. 18, 2020 4 a.m.
Comments
Pedestrains walk past the Walgreens on the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street on Monday, October 12, 2020 in San Francisco, Calif. The Walgreens at 790 Van Ness Avenue is scheduled to close on November 11.
Pedestrains walk past the Walgreens on the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street on Monday, October 12, 2020 in San Francisco, Calif. The Walgreens at 790 Van Ness Avenue is scheduled to close on November 11.
Photo: Lea Suzuki / The Chronicle
After months of seeing its shelves repeatedly cleaned out by brazen shoplifters, the Walgreens at Van Ness and Eddy in San Francisco is getting ready to close.

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“The last day is Nov. 11,” Walgreens spokesman Phil Caruso said.

The drugstore, which serves many older people who live in the Opera Plaza area, is the seventh Walgreens to close in the city since 2019.


“All of us knew it was coming. Whenever we go in there, they always have problems with shoplifters, ” said longtime customer Sebastian Luke, who lives a block away and is a frequent customer who has been posting photos of the thefts for months. The other day, Luke photographed a man casually clearing a couple of shelves and placing the goods into a backpack.

“I feel sorry for the clerks, they are regularly being verbally assaulted,” Luke said. “The clerks say there is nothing they can do. They say Walgreens’ policy is to not get involved. They don’t want anyone getting injured or getting sued, so the guys just keep coming in and taking whatever they want.”

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For security reasons, Walgreens declined to provide details on their security policies, but Caruso did say that “the safety of our team members and customers is our top concern.”

A recent trip to the store revealed aisle after aisle of empty or near-empty shelves. Beauty supplies appear to be a favored target.

Most of the remaining products were locked behind plastic theft guards, which have become increasingly common at drugstores in recent years.

But at Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street, even the jugs of clothing detergent on display were looped with locked anti-theft cables.


When a clerk was asked where all the goods had gone, he said, “Go ask the people in the alleys, they have it all.”

Homeless encampments are common in the neighborhood, including two just across Eddy Street.

No sooner had the clerk spoken than a man wearing a virus mask walked in, emptied two shelves of snacks into a bag, then headed back for the door.

As he walked past the checkout line, a customer called out, “Sure you don’t want a drink with that?”

Just across busy Van Ness and down a block, a competing CVS pharmacy was fully stocked.

The difference? The CVS had a security guard at the door.

“Up there, they are closer to the Tenderloin. It’s the Wild West,” said a CVS clerk who was standing with the security guard.

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The homeless encampments and the thefts at the Walgreens were front and center at a neighborhood town hall at St. Mary’s Cathedral in March.

Police responded by placing two officers and a squad car outside the store at the corner of Eddy and Van Ness.

“Everyone was happy,” Luke said.

But as the pandemic shutdown dragged on, the officers were needed elsewhere. And a short time later, the thieves returned in full force.


Why not?

Under California law, theft of less than $950 in goods is treated as a nonviolent misdemeanor. The maximum sentence for petty theft is six months in county jail. But most of the time the suspect is released with conditions attached.

The Van Ness location is at least the third Walgreens to close in the city in the past year. The Walgreens at 16th and Mission streets closed in December. The Walgreens at 730 Market St. closed in March.

It’s hard to pin down how much the market forces that prompted the closure of 200 Walgreens nationwide was a factor in the local closures and how much theft contributed — or if it was a combination of reasons.

In February, the local news website Hoodline reported that an employee at the Market Street store said the store couldn’t cope with the shoplifting, which was costing the company $1,000 a day.

“Organized retail crime in San Francisco has increased the challenge for all retail, and Walgreens is not immune to that,” company spokesman Caruso said.

Jay Cheng, public policy director for the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, said the rising incidents of shoplifting and worsening street conditions have made it difficult for all neighborhood retail stores to continue to operate in San Francisco.

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LOCAL // PHIL MATIER
Rampant shoplifting leads to another Walgreens closing in S.F.
Photo of Phil Matier
Phil Matier
Oct. 18, 2020 Updated: Oct. 18, 2020 4 a.m.
Comments
Pedestrains walk past the Walgreens on the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street on Monday, October 12, 2020 in San Francisco, Calif. The Walgreens at 790 Van Ness Avenue is scheduled to close on November 11.
Pedestrains walk past the Walgreens on the corner of Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street on Monday, October 12, 2020 in San Francisco, Calif. The Walgreens at 790 Van Ness Avenue is scheduled to close on November 11.
Photo: Lea Suzuki / The Chronicle
After months of seeing its shelves repeatedly cleaned out by brazen shoplifters, the Walgreens at Van Ness and Eddy in San Francisco is getting ready to close.

SFC-logoLOG IN
You've reached your article limit.
There’s so much more to explore.
Subscribe now. Cancel anytime.
LIMITED-TIME OFFER
Only 99¢ for 12 weeks
Unlimited Digital Access
SUBSCRIBE NOW
“The last day is Nov. 11,” Walgreens spokesman Phil Caruso said.

The drugstore, which serves many older people who live in the Opera Plaza area, is the seventh Walgreens to close in the city since 2019.


“All of us knew it was coming. Whenever we go in there, they always have problems with shoplifters, ” said longtime customer Sebastian Luke, who lives a block away and is a frequent customer who has been posting photos of the thefts for months. The other day, Luke photographed a man casually clearing a couple of shelves and placing the goods into a backpack.

“I feel sorry for the clerks, they are regularly being verbally assaulted,” Luke said. “The clerks say there is nothing they can do. They say Walgreens’ policy is to not get involved. They don’t want anyone getting injured or getting sued, so the guys just keep coming in and taking whatever they want.”

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SUBSCRIBE
For security reasons, Walgreens declined to provide details on their security policies, but Caruso did say that “the safety of our team members and customers is our top concern.”

A recent trip to the store revealed aisle after aisle of empty or near-empty shelves. Beauty supplies appear to be a favored target.

Most of the remaining products were locked behind plastic theft guards, which have become increasingly common at drugstores in recent years.

But at Van Ness Avenue and Eddy Street, even the jugs of clothing detergent on display were looped with locked anti-theft cables.


When a clerk was asked where all the goods had gone, he said, “Go ask the people in the alleys, they have it all.”

Homeless encampments are common in the neighborhood, including two just across Eddy Street.

No sooner had the clerk spoken than a man wearing a virus mask walked in, emptied two shelves of snacks into a bag, then headed back for the door.

As he walked past the checkout line, a customer called out, “Sure you don’t want a drink with that?”

Just across busy Van Ness and down a block, a competing CVS pharmacy was fully stocked.

The difference? The CVS had a security guard at the door.

“Up there, they are closer to the Tenderloin. It’s the Wild West,” said a CVS clerk who was standing with the security guard.

Related Stories

POLITICS
BY BOB EGELKO
California Prop. 20 would boost punishments for a variety of...

LOCAL
BY PHIL MATIER
Burglars switch to homes in S.F. as tourists, and their cars,...

LOCAL
BY PHIL MATIER
Big Tobacco goes big in effort to quash law banning sales of...
The homeless encampments and the thefts at the Walgreens were front and center at a neighborhood town hall at St. Mary’s Cathedral in March.

Police responded by placing two officers and a squad car outside the store at the corner of Eddy and Van Ness.

“Everyone was happy,” Luke said.

But as the pandemic shutdown dragged on, the officers were needed elsewhere. And a short time later, the thieves returned in full force.


Why not?

Under California law, theft of less than $950 in goods is treated as a nonviolent misdemeanor. The maximum sentence for petty theft is six months in county jail. But most of the time the suspect is released with conditions attached.

The Van Ness location is at least the third Walgreens to close in the city in the past year. The Walgreens at 16th and Mission streets closed in December. The Walgreens at 730 Market St. closed in March.

It’s hard to pin down how much the market forces that prompted the closure of 200 Walgreens nationwide was a factor in the local closures and how much theft contributed — or if it was a combination of reasons.

In February, the local news website Hoodline reported that an employee at the Market Street store said the store couldn’t cope with the shoplifting, which was costing the company $1,000 a day.

“Organized retail crime in San Francisco has increased the challenge for all retail, and Walgreens is not immune to that,” company spokesman Caruso said.

Jay Cheng, public policy director for the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, said the rising incidents of shoplifting and worsening street conditions have made it difficult for all neighborhood retail stores to continue to operate in San Francisco.


“We’ve already seen California Attorney General Xavier Becerra uncover a major Bay Area retail theft ring with over $8 million in stolen merchandise,” Cheng said. “These crimes make it dangerous for businesses, employees and customers, and need to be addressed.”

Some stores have hired private security firms or off-duty police officers to deter would-be thieves.

But security is expensive and can cost upward of $1,000 a day.

Add in the losses from theft, and the cost of doing business can become too high for a store to stay open. As for the customers at the Van Ness Walgreens, their prescriptions will be handled by the Walgreens at 1301 Franklin St.

At least for as long as it stays open.

http://www...another-Walgreens-15654730.php
Paramount
Member
Mon Oct 19 07:35:43
Jesus Christ. You have started to Copy and Paste like Hot Rod.

How do we know that the real reason for closing down 7 stores is because of shoplifting and not because of other financial problems? Maybe only one store was closed down in 2019, and then the other six was closed down in 2020 because of the Corona pandemic and Trump’s mishandling of it?

But okay maybe it has something to do with shoplifting too, or their security policies. Listen to this:

”The other day, Luke photographed a man casually clearing a couple of shelves and placing the goods into a backpack.”

”The clerks say there is nothing they can do. They say Walgreens’ policy is to not get involved. They don’t want anyone getting injured or getting sued, so the guys just keep coming in and taking whatever they want.”


LOL. With a policy like that, that people can walk into their stores and empty the shelves and walk out without paying for the goods, and no one will say or do anything.... what do you think will happen? lol

The word is on the street that you can get things for free at Walgreens. lol

How stupid are Walgreens? They practically have themselves to blame for not hiring armed security guards.

They are getting robbed every day and they be like: ”Nope, we won’t do anything.”
habebe
Member
Mon Oct 19 07:41:03
,The clerks say there is nothing they can do. They say Walgreens’ policy is to not get involved. "

Going to Walgreens, who wants half priced laundry soap?
habebe
Member
Mon Oct 19 07:49:53
Paramount, Most stores have similar policies though.

Kohls , as one ofmthe toughest policies and insanely high quality cameras. still didn't stop a.buddy of mine from taking thousands in clothes and watches.
Paramount
Member
Mon Oct 19 07:50:35
”Homeless people, drug addicts, crime, gang activity, and total anarchy.

This shit is an everyday occurence in Democratic-run cities.”


So why don’t they clean up the streets? Put them on buses to a Republican-run city.
Daemon
Member
Mon Oct 19 07:55:55
"Just across busy Van Ness and down a block, a competing CVS pharmacy was fully stocked.

The difference? The CVS had a security guard at the door."

There is your solution.



Also, I'm sorry for you Rugian:
"You've reached your article limit.
There’s so much more to explore.
Subscribe now. Cancel anytime. "
habebe
Member
Mon Oct 19 08:08:22
The security guard rarely helps much, pwrhaps a mild deterence effect but not in the city.

Im Frankford ( N Philly) the walmart I went to had security locks on like everything ( t shirts, underwear) deodorant was in an wncloaed section with its own checkout, like makeup.

They had 2 private security guards in a pick up truck and a police car in the parking lot at all times.
And one entrance and one exit both manned by workera chexking receipts.

Did nothing people would just be brazen about it, why? its N Philly they know hundreds if not thousands steal shit from there everyday, irs not uncommon to see junkies/hookers passed out in piles just out front, they knownthe cops wont come for anything under like 1500 cause they're worried about people getting shot.

The biggest shock to me was how junkies slept in piles on the sidewalks, especially outside of thw help clinics ( they give everything but the drugs to get high)

When I was there they just started having nurses indoors that would ahoot you up.
Paramount
Member
Mon Oct 19 08:16:11
So it sounds like America has got to do something about their drug problem and homelessness. If you fix that, then stores won’t be robbed as much, if at all, and the streets would be clean and safe.
habebe
Member
Mon Oct 19 09:14:59
Paramount, Well I thinks it more than that though. The following comes from my personal experiences living in N Philly alone but

1. We need better jobs.

In the city its plausible to make a living just off hustling, whether it be legal or not. I knew a guy who made 1k a week mostly selling cigarettes $8/ a pack and 2 for a dollar. He also sold sodas. These hustled evolved around high taxes and avoiding them feom region to region.

But for the most part many people have a hard time holding a legit good paying job, at best they get by, which at least in the city there is a tremendous amount of free help from government and charities.

2. Infrastructure. Everything is crumbling, poor investment IMO has direct links to the drug/poverty related problems as well as poor infrastructure and filth, the trash pick up is not up.to pace there so there is literally trash ankle deep everywhere.

Most of these people get by but really aren't financially doing great, we definitley have an income gap problem. Negative income taxes or UBI IMHO may be the best start to fixing this but it needs to accompanied by targeted fixes for those other issues.
Rugian
Member
Mon Oct 19 09:57:58
Bah, it posted the ads. FML

"So why don’t they clean up the streets? Put them on buses to a Republican-run city."

That is, in fact, what they try to do.

http://www...her-municipalities-11575412379

The problem wih that strategy is that communities that actually gove a shit about law and order dont tolerate this filth. It's much easier to be a homeless person in San Francisco than, says Charleston.

"LOL. With a policy like that, that people can walk into their stores and empty the shelves and walk out without paying for the goods, and no one will say or do anything.... what do you think will happen? lol"

Theres nothing they can do. California leftists last year passed Prop 47, which means you can now steal up to $950 worth of goods without incurring a felony charge.

Combine that with progressive DAs who selectively ignore laws that lead to "racially unjust outcomes," and that severely limits your options for stopping these people. You can have them arrested, sure, but they'll be back on the street almost immediately.
Paramount
Member
Mon Oct 19 10:14:42
” Infrastructure. Everything is crumbling, poor investment IMO has direct links to the drug/poverty related problems as well as poor infrastructure and filth”

It sounds like you all need to vote for the Democrats then and ask them to raise the taxes for the ultra rich and corporation, so that states can invest in infrastructure and new jobs. They can afford to contribute to society.
habebe
Member
Mon Oct 19 10:40:59
Paramount, Philly has had Democratic government for decades. PA ( the state) has also had plenty of Democratic leadership and we had 8 years of Obama.....still this persists.
habebe
Member
Mon Oct 19 11:29:32
Frankford Ave
http://maps.app.goo.gl/ZogNAkCKrV3WyNkJ7

they have a Street view od my neighborhood while I stayed there. It was almost never that clean though.
sam adams
Member
Mon Oct 19 15:54:50
Punishing criminals is racist, since black people commit most crime.

The left is so fucking retarded that they will scrap the basic tenents of civilization rather than reconsider their retarded views.
Dakyron
Member
Tue Oct 20 09:46:33
San Francisco is the worst city in America. Worse than Newark. Worse than Atlanta. I haven't been to Oakland, so I don't know, but it is a shithole.
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