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Utopia Talk / Politics / Republican States suck
jergul
large member
Tue Feb 16 04:09:34
http://poweroutage.us/

Look at the power outages. Suck, suck, suck and suck.
habebe
Member
Tue Feb 16 04:14:32
Bidens in office, what did you expect?
Rugian
Member
Tue Feb 16 04:15:55
People Who Moved To Texas From California Finally Feeling At Home Now That Power Is Out

February 15th, 2021

http://bab...-at-home-now-that-power-is-out
habebe
Member
Tue Feb 16 04:16:59
AUSTIN, TX—Thousands of people who escaped the desolate wasteland of California have found new opportunities by moving to Texas. To help them feel right at home, even the weather is extending some Texas hospitality by knocking out power stations-- giving the former Californians a taste of the blackouts they're used to.



I chuckled.
patom
Member
Tue Feb 16 05:46:34
Just a couple of months after Texas Governor talks about leaving the Union, he's now begging for Federal disaster relief. Send all them Texans a can of kerosene to wash their socks in. It'll help keep the ants off their candy asses.
Nimatzo
iChihuaha
Tue Feb 16 07:35:48
It is funny, but this winter turned so cold, that Sweden had to start the oil burning reserve plant so the Southern parts can have electricity. The topic we discussed a few month ago about electricity production vs capacity. Turns out this winter is one of those winters the Swedish report was predicting would lead to burning oil.

It has reignited the fight over the future of nuclear energy, but the Greens are standing their ground. It seems they want to kill the issue, by not taking a needed decision on end of life storage for the fuel rods, which will lead to a much quicker dismantling of Swedish reactors.
Habebe
Member
Tue Feb 16 08:22:36
Funny you should bring that up, because France ( for years a model of Nuclear power) has been running short and Norway has filled in the gaps from what I read.
patom
Member
Tue Feb 16 08:49:22
Just watched '60 Minutes' Sunday and Bill Gates claims he has a new nuclear generator that is cheaper and doesn't require water to keep the rods cool.
patom
Member
Tue Feb 16 08:50:40
http://www...-change-60-minutes-2021-02-14/
Forwyn
Member
Tue Feb 16 10:51:28
A system that relies on turbines spinning and trucks on the road fails when turbines freeze and trucks can't safely move down the road. Whodathunkit

Hopefully a new wave of people warming their hands on coal grills will be nuclear pilled
Sam Adams
Member
Tue Feb 16 12:20:07
A once in 25 year storm does to the energy grid of texas what liberal mismanagement in California does every other week.
Sam Adams
Member
Tue Feb 16 12:22:42
"A system that relies on turbines spinning and trucks on the road fails when turbines freeze and trucks can't safely move down the road."

Even the natural gas pipelines were freezing. Wind turbines were frozen. Solar panels were covered with snow. Just a mess all over.
Dukhat
Member
Wed Feb 17 00:21:06
funny how once-in-hundred year weather events keep becoming more and more common. Samantha is on the edge of understanding.

"Why are all the planes grounded by weather again?"
tumbleweed
the wanderer
Wed Feb 17 00:24:36
"Even the natural gas pipelines were freezing. Wind turbines were frozen"

not stopping the governor (& Tucker Carlson) for only blaming 'the Green New Deal'... which isn't even policy...
Paramount
Member
Wed Feb 17 03:07:14
Millions without power and 21 dead as ferocious winter weather sweeps US

Many Texans were struggling, most in houses not built to retain heat. In Austin, Matthew Micik had gone 24 hours without power, the temperature in his house below 35F (1.6C). After finding a hotel room in nearby San Marcos, he drove through ice and sleet only to find most of that town had lost power too. He spent the night in his car.

From Galveston, Jessica Knofla said: “Basically, everyone who lives here had no warning and is stuck on a blacked-out island with no major stores open and no lights on the road. It’s absolutely infuriating and I’m fucking pissed.”

http://www...test-news-power-outages-deaths


It sounds like it sucks in Texas. But now as Californians are moving to Texas, the Democrats may take over the control of the State in 4-8 years and fix it.
Paramount
Member
Wed Feb 17 03:16:58
The electricity outages suffered by millions of Texans amid frigid temperatures sweeping across the United States have been seized upon by conservative commentators presenting a false narrative that renewable power was to blame.

“We should never build another wind turbine in Texas,” read a Facebook post on Tuesday by the state’s agriculture commissioner, Sid Miller. “The experiment failed big time.”

Fox News also joined in with one of its presenters, Tucker Carlson, claiming that renewables were to blame and that Texas was “totally reliant on windfarms”. The Wall Street Journal said in an editorial that “the power grid is becoming less reliable due to growing reliance on wind and solar, which can’t provide power 24 hours a day, seven days a week”.

While some wind turbines did freeze, failures in natural gas, coal and nuclear energy systems were responsible for nearly twice as many outages as renewables, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (Ercot), which operates the state’s power grid, said in a press conference on Tuesday.

http://www...wables-for-texas-storm-outages

Why don’t people get the facts before they speak?
Habebe
Member
Wed Feb 17 04:42:43
Paramount, Because facts still have a perception that can change a view. People see what they WANT to see.

Your article says that roughly 2/3 of the outages are from Gas/coal/Nuclear sources.(why is Nuclear not counted as renewable/green?)

But that leaves out some context.

1. Only 20% of their power is generated by renewables.80% os from non renewables.

So clearly "renewables" are faltering at a much higher rate than non.

Now I'd also.be curious to see the causes.Is it a retransmission issue? I mean you cant blame.coal for a downed line as any source of power will have a downed line.

Windmills stopped turning, from what I gather as they froze up. Ive also heard unconfirmed reports that Natural gas pipes froze.

Now is this any reason to not expand wind and solar? Absolutely not.This is a once in a lifetime storm, the lesson I get from this is that this should always keep a back up, if the problem is not transmission, then extra storage of power ahead of such storms seems a logical step.

Now perhaps a strategic reserve of either battery power, oil/gas whatever should be look into, but again this is no regular storm.
Habebe
Member
Wed Feb 17 04:48:21
http://paylesspower.com/blog/texas-renewable-energy/

Here is some breakdown of the energy. Basically all.the renewables are wind farms in TX.

Again, thats not co aidering Nuclear as a renewable, but. Whatever.
patom
Member
Wed Feb 17 06:01:06
Time for people with money to buy stock in Kohler, and other home generator systems.
Kaylana
Moderator
Wed Feb 17 06:30:22
It's worth noting that the wind turbines would not have gone down if they had been winterized as per regulations, but because the Texas power grid is not connected to the rest of the country, the power suppliers don't have to answer to a lot of those regulations.

Wind turbines in much colder places in the country don't freeze up because they didn't skip that step.
jergul
large member
Wed Feb 17 06:34:26
Interstate connectors is the obvious correction. The disaster proves that Texas is not large enough to manage supply disruptions on its own.

Kaylyana
The point with the thread is not to mock Texas, but to demonstrate that power disruptions do not follow the red-blue divide.

The tone was set last year in equivalent threads about California.
patom
Member
Wed Feb 17 07:42:54
jergul, I've met and listened to more Texans than many on this site. That was another state I did a lot of miles in. They seem to feel that the Lone Star State is doing us all a favor by being part of the Union. They think they're the biggest and best at just about everything. Hell they don't even grow as much beef as Florida does.
Renzo Marquez
Member
Wed Feb 17 07:55:19
Paramount is correct. The wind turbines aren't the main cause/problem. That's rightwing fake news.
patom
Member
Wed Feb 17 08:12:19
Most of the time when we lose power here in Maine its because of trees falling on power lines. Now we have lots of trees here so that's why I have an automatic generator that runs on propane. It'll run for 4 or 5 days on a 100 lb. bottle.

Now I know a lot of homes in the south use Propane as a heat source so all you need is a separate regulator to run your generator off the same bottle.
Y2A
Member
Wed Feb 17 09:07:22
Harris cty is back up to light green in that outage map. 110k out of 1.96m. seems to be getting back to normal.
Y2A
Member
Wed Feb 17 09:08:57
still 2.5m out in all of texas though.
habebe
Member
Wed Feb 17 09:41:12
Jergul, You seem to miss the point about the complaints in CA.Severe Storm systems causing power outages compared to just not being able to meet demand are different.

In this case in general TX is not prepared for severe ice and snow storms because it's very rare that they get them.
Y2A
Member
Wed Feb 17 09:53:33
now it has harris cty up to 355k
Kaylana
Moderator
Wed Feb 17 11:22:57
Not everyone in Texas agrees with bein on our own power grid, it's always been chaos on our energy pricing. People who are against regulations are for it, and people like me who think we're stronger and more stable when we're combined are against it. Think Brexit and anti-Brexit.

I bet we just won a lot of people over to the union side of thinking this week.
jergul
large member
Wed Feb 17 11:26:07
Habebe
California has regional power transfer issues, not supply issues. Its part of an interregional power system.

Texas is not and that leaves texas vulnerable to disruption.

72 hours is the breakpoint for suckiness. Things can happen and people need to be able to self-sustain for a 3 days.

But your authorities suck if they cannot either reestablish supply or arrange for alternate shelter within that time.
Renzo Marquez
Member
Wed Feb 17 11:28:57
Kaylana
Moderator Wed Feb 17 11:22:57
"Not everyone in Texas agrees with bein on our own power grid, it's always been chaos on our energy pricing."

Yeah, it sounds wild. Was watching a Youtube video yesterday and one guy (who felt lucky he still at least had juice) said his kWh rate went up 30x and another said based on variable rates he was going to pay $200-$300 per day while the rates were up (not sure if the second guy was referring to gas, electric, or both).
Habebe
Member
Wed Feb 17 11:29:39
In general Texas has done very well though. Producing more power than any state and 1/3 of the nation's wind power with its own regulations instead of federal regulation.
Sam Adams
Member
Wed Feb 17 12:14:11
"Dukhat
Member Wed Feb 17 00:21:06
funny how once-in-hundred year weather events keep becoming more and more common."

Lol cuckhat trying to science and math. Aint that cute. Like a baby trying to walk.

“Basically, everyone who lives here had no warning and is stuck on a blacked-out island with no major stores open and no lights on the road. It’s absolutely infuriating and I’m fucking pissed.”

Lol listen to that retarded cunt. This storm was obvious 5 days ahead, and fairly likely an astonishing 2 weeks ahead. Ive never seen a storm better forecast, in fact. I pulled my companies assets out of texas 12 days ago.


Anyway, the texas grid could use more interties with other grids but is vastly better managed than progressive dreamworlds of CA or Germany, for obvious example.

Right wing energy policy is clearly better than left wing energy policy, though a mixed center-right approach is likely the pinnacle of best.
Forwyn
Member
Wed Feb 17 15:54:12
"The disaster proves that Texas is not large enough to manage supply disruptions on its own."

Lol no. Texas is larger than Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway - put together; in an area the size of continental Norway, Finland, and Denmark - put together.

Texas is a net energy exporter.

Mismanagement and cutting corners will leave you in the same position as California.
Dukhat
Member
Wed Feb 17 16:09:28
Resorting to generic platitudes is the clearest sign you've lost the argument.
obaminated
Member
Wed Feb 17 16:16:22
Says the guy who calls everyone who disagrees with him, both left and right, nazis and conservatives without offering a counter argument.
Habebe
Member
Wed Feb 17 16:43:36
Obam, Dukhat often talks shit on himself as if he doesn't realize it.
Habebe
Member
Wed Feb 17 16:43:37
Obam, Dukhat often talks shit on himself as if he doesn't realize it.
Kaylana
Moderator
Wed Feb 17 21:08:35
"Lol listen to that retarded cunt. This storm was obvious 5 days ahead..."

Incorrect, this was not predicted. We knew the storm was coming, sure. And the night before it hit, temperature lows were PREDICTED to be 14 to 20 degrees higher than what they actually were.

The foul weather was EXPECTED to last a day or two, with above freezing temperatures to return Tuesday, even as warm as 60 degrees. Not Friday or Saturday with a hopeful high of 35F.

The snow was PREDICTED to be 1 to 2 inches, not 6 to 10.

Energy was REPORTED to expect rolling blackouts lasting 10 to 45 minutes AS A LAST RESORT if not enough people conserved energy. Not a guaranteed 72 hours without power, 36 hours without water minimum due to shutting power off at water plants and water mains bursting around the state from the subzero temperatures that WERE NOT PREDICTED, and what water does come back is not safe to drink or wash with for who knows how long now.

The storm was predicted. What hit us was most definitely NOT predicted. Trust me, I check the weather dozens of times a day because it changes hard and fast here, especially since climate change effects have gone into full gear.

What we were told to prepare for is to be snowed in for a couple of days and to drip faucets at night, a typical Texas storm. What happened was temperatures we haven't been dealt since the 180ps and for a period of time that has never been recorded in Texas this far south.

Context.
Kaylana
Moderator
Wed Feb 17 21:17:47

Wed Feb 17 15:54:12
"The disaster proves that Texas is not large enough to manage supply disruptions on its own."

"Lol no. Texas is larger than Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway - put together; in an area the size of continental Norway, Finland, and Denmark - put together.

Texas is a net energy exporter.

Mismanagement and cutting corners will leave you in the same position as California."

---

Forwyn is correct. Texas has more than enough power to weather even subzero temperatures. This was absolutely a failure of regulatory actions and was warned about both in 1989 and 2011 with other similar events that almost, but not quite, could have been disasters.

The reason being, the handful of people (I'm talking three people here, PUCT) whom are in control of supply and demand via regulatory actions or inaction (such as keeping commercial energy cheap by skipping the Federally mandated winterizing regulation that even Florida is required to have), are ALSO in charge of determining the price of energy (that's the bill us regular working stiffs in our freezing uninsulated homes pay), which is gauged by, you guessed it, supply and demand!
Kaylana
Moderator
Wed Feb 17 21:20:09
Oh and the three committee members who make up PUCT are appointed by the governor. So, Texas voters, take note!
Y2A
Member
Wed Feb 17 21:45:01
it seems that contrary to popular belief, texas can be easily messed with*

*except El Paso and the Panhandle
Sam Adams
Member
Wed Feb 17 22:21:46
"And the night before it hit, temperature lows were PREDICTED to be 14 to 20 degrees higher than what they actually were."

You need a better predictor.

Like i said, this storm was so obvious i moved my company's assets out of the way 12 days ago... which was 8-9 days or so before SHTF.

Perhaps some shitty accuweather app was that off, but I wasnt and the national weather service is never that wrong either.
smart dude
Member
Wed Feb 17 22:46:26
"Derp derp derp"
-Kaylana

Go back to HO.
Kaylana
Moderator
Wed Feb 17 23:01:45
You are so full of it.
jergul
large member
Thu Feb 18 03:02:09
Kaylana
Those countries are not large enough either. Hence regional interconnectors that ties them into a wider grid network.

Disruption one place can be offset from others.

By size, I was not really speaking about energy, but rather geographical diversity so that no one single disruption can effect the whole area.
obaminated
Member
Thu Feb 18 03:27:02
Republican states suck? Um comparison to what? Government isnt perfect and cant account for crazy weather.

Hence cuckhat argues it is the problem of climate change. He ignores that our state has regular power outages during mild weather. He is a moron and part of the problem.
jergul
large member
Thu Feb 18 03:42:22
Obam
Underinvesting in infrastructure is a gamble because bad things happen.

About half my electricity bill is for infrastructure. I know because it is specified on the invoice. The upside? Electricity security. My town is connected to the regional high power grid in 3 places.

Nice things cost money.
patom
Member
Thu Feb 18 04:13:04
We have regular power outages here in Maine. 98% of them are trees falling on power lines. They don't cut trees that overhang power lines like they did 50 years ago. That was when there was a thing called 'Preventative Maintenance'.

It seems that somewhere in the last 50 years much of business and industry have decided that it was cheaper to not touch anything until it breaks. Even predictable failures, like letting trees over grow power lines. Ice storms, wet heavy snow, high winds after heavy rain = limbs and trees taking down power lines.
habebe
Member
Thu Feb 18 04:56:39
PAtom, Even on my private property the power company here trims all the trees every summer that grow near power lines.

My complaint is they way they do it. They only cut away from the lines, instead of topping the trees below the lines, considering the weather we get I would like the trees topped below, it just makes.sense, they will eventually fall.
Y2A
Member
Thu Feb 18 08:34:05
looks like cruz bailed on his ppl

http://mob...nTX/status/1362398646667476998


Public Citizen Texas
@PublicCitizenTX
.
@SenTedCruz
got elected to represent the people of Texas.

Then, in the middle of a pandemic, when millions of his constituents were struggling without power, heat, or water, he flew to Cancún.

Don’t be like Sen. Ted Cruz. #TexasBlackout
patom
Member
Thu Feb 18 08:37:18
habebe, the power companies take away the danger limbs. It's up to you to either have the tree removed or cut it down yourself.
Y2A
Member
Thu Feb 18 08:52:23
down to 500k outages statewide.
Sam Adams
Member
Thu Feb 18 11:11:38
"looks like cruz bailed on his ppl"

Yikes. What terrible PR retard was responsible for that.
Rugian
Member
Thu Feb 18 11:18:26
I mean, he's a US Senator, not a state official; it's not like he plays any sort of direct role in repairing TX's power system.

But yeah the optics are really bad. Dude should have known that was going to blow up in his face.
LazyCommunist
Member
Thu Feb 18 11:26:31

Russia will sell you some food if you ask nicely.

http://the...alentines-day-produce-massacre



Texas growers see Valentine’s Day produce massacre

February 16, 2021

Valentine’s night of 2021 will be remembered as the “Valentine’s Day massacre for the fruit and vegetable industry of south Texas,” Bret Erickson, senior vice president of business affairs for J&D Produce Inc., said the follow morning.

J&D, one of Texas’ largest fresh vegetable growers, has a large packing and shipping facility in Edinburg, TX, and grows thousands of acres of vegetables throughout the lower reaches of the Rio Grande Valley.

“We had temperatures of 24, 25 degrees at our farms," he said. "This was a whopper, with more to come.” When asked if any vegetables survive that cold for extended periods, he said, "I doubt it. We are prepared for the worst but hoping for the best. The celery and greens are all going to be ‘toast’.”

He withheld hope that onions and other root crops might have survived, but “tonight is supposed to be as cold as it was last night, if not colder.”

Erickson said J&D’s field temperatures dropped to 32 at midnight, after a cold Valentine’s Day. “We’re below freezing now, and it’s not to get back to 32 until noon today. That’s 12 hours below freezing.”

Erickson heard that some citrus growers endured temperatures of 21 on Valentine’s night. Temperatures for the night of Feb. 15-16 were below freezing for 12 to 14 hours. “At the end of the day, very little of what we grow can survive.” He hopefully added the afterthought, “We’re not sure.”

Erickson said growers in Winter Garden, TX, had fields that were below freezing for several days. “Cabbage and broccoli are hardy, but for that many days, it’s hard to survive.”

Erickson added, “We are all stressed” by losses from the “unheard of” cold. “But at the end of the day, that’s nature and farming. You win some and you lose some. We’ll take our licks here and move forward.”

Dante Galeazzi, CEO of the Texas International Produce Association, said on the morning of Feb. 15 that many south Texas homes — and produce offices and packing houses — were without power. Not only were residents perilously cold, but produce companies were trying to operate without electricity. Galeazzi said produce firms have functioned in the past by running a computer and printer from their vehicles’ electric power. He suggested that bills of lading would probably be printed from front seats again this week.

Preliminary efforts to reach the Texas citrus industry were unsuccessful, but Erickson said some citrus groves were reported to have suffered temperatures as low as 21. Erickson said Texas citrus harvest was expected to have run for another six weeks. His understanding was that more than fruit-on-trees was harmed. The citrus trees were blooming for next year’s crop. And citrus trees also suffered damage.

Galeazzi said growers in Uvalde, TX, had five or six inches of snow on the morning of Feb. 15.

In the southern Rio Grande Valley, it rained throughout Valentine’s Day weekend. Galeazzi offered hope that rain, which was still on crops as freezing temperatures arrived, would have turned to an ice coating and offered some protection from deepening cold.

At a minimum, Texas citrus trees suffered leaf burn, Galeazzi said. “Like any weather event, it will take a week or two to know the extent of damage.: some things will bounce back — others won’t. Definitely, there are some people who are going to be hurt.”
LazyCommunist
Member
Thu Feb 18 11:31:07
Capitalism in its final stage:

http://usa...ok-post-under-fire/6786899002/

Texas mayor who wrote 'only the strong will survive' amid deadly winter storm says he has resigned

COLORADO CITY, Texas – The mayor of Colorado City, Texas, says he has resigned amid a controversy over a Facebook post in which he said it is not the local government's responsibility to support residents in the wake of catastrophic weather and power outages this week.

In the since-deleted post, Tim Boyd said he was going to "hurt some feelings" and proceeded to chastise "lazy" people "looking for a damn handout."

"No one owes you are (sic) your family anything, nor is it the local government's responsibility to support you during trying times like this," Boyd said in his Tuesday morning post, which was obtained by the Abilene Reporter-News, part of the USA TODAY Network.

“Only the strong will survive and the weak will parish (sic)," Boyd wrote.

The post was made as millions in Texas were without power following a winter storm. Utilities from Minnesota to Texas and Mississippi implemented rolling blackouts to ease the burden on power grids straining to meet extreme demand for heat and electricity.
Habebe
Member
Thu Feb 18 11:37:37
Tom, In general I cant complain about our power company, its a co op. But listen while they are up there just trim the whole tree below the power lines, if the tree falls, they come fix it at no extra cost directly, but if it's widespread Id imagine it raises rates or atleast they give us less backnatbthe end of the year.
Paramount
Member
Thu Feb 18 11:45:26
So maybe the power outage is a trick to make Liberals move back to California?
Habebe
Member
Thu Feb 18 11:51:38
Paramount, But it's still worse in Cali.....
Y2A
Member
Thu Feb 18 19:55:26
Colorado City, Texas....population 4,146.....



Wait for it....



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitchell_County,_Texas

Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 84.1% 2,170 15.4% 397 0.5% 12
Y2A
Member
Thu Feb 18 20:47:03
LOL

The New York Times

BREAKING NEWS

“Anyone can or want to leave?” Texts show how Ted Cruz’s family quickly planned a Cancún getaway after losing power in the Texas storm.
Thursday, February 18, 2021 7:30 PM EST

As the Cruzes were away, millions of Texans were still without electricity, many had no running water and the icy air that swept into the state was so severe that the Federal Emergency Management Agency had been activated to send supplies, including generators.
Rugian
Member
Thu Feb 18 20:52:37
^ some "friends" right there that would forward private texts to the NYT

No wonder politicians are so cynical.
Forwyn
Member
Thu Feb 18 20:57:52
Makes you wonder why the Senate met for one day on the 16th and then are scheduled off for the entire rest of the month.
Y2A
Member
Thu Feb 18 21:07:25
Flyin' Ted
obaminated
Member
Thu Feb 18 23:56:41
not much he could have done if he stayed besides possibly suffer. if given the option of being fully aware a major storm was coming and i could stay or leave i would choose to leave as well.
jergul
large member
Fri Feb 19 02:43:36
Just a reminder

1. A 2ndary, independent heat and cooking source
2. A battery powered DAB radio
3. 3 days supply of everything including water
4. Cash on hand. 2 weeks worth is fine

Outages lasting more than 3 days is a government responsibility to redress. Also, feel free to note that guns and ammo are not on the list.
patom
Member
Fri Feb 19 04:44:05
A fine demonstration of leadership by Ted Cruz. Leadership Republican style.
jergul
large member
Fri Feb 19 05:02:57
As a natural born Canadian, you would think he could deal with a cold spell.
Habebe
Member
Fri Feb 19 05:42:33
Obam, Eh, I mean he makes his living off being a congressman , who happens to be in thenpublic spotlight frequently.

It was Absolutley a bad idea. Whats the old saying, never let a crisis go to waste ?

He would have done better to try and organize supply deliveries or even work a soup kitchen or whatever...his job is very image oriented.
Habebe
Member
Fri Feb 19 05:43:47
Jergul, Sure guns and ammo, dont forget condoms and lube assuming your talking about Norway, all the anal rape issues.
jergul
large member
Fri Feb 19 05:50:38
I think you are mistaking Norway for your time in the penetrationary habebe
Habebe
Member
Fri Feb 19 06:38:29
http://www...ape-in-norway-silent-epidemic/

Apparently rape is an epidemic in Norway....
Kaylana
Moderator
Fri Feb 19 07:26:20
Cruz bailing and then continuously changing his lies and excuses as each piece of truth is leaked doesn't upset me, I always knew he was a hypocritical piece of dog crap, and I am gratified to know someone around him was willing to rat him out for his cowardice and bullshit.

But what really raises my blood pressure are all of his supporters jumping to his defense, either by parroting all of his initial lies as excuses (your puppet strings are showing, voters), or by saying everyone has a right to vacation and time with kids if they can afford it.

Yes, good, everyone deserves a vacation. But NOT during a life threatening historical emergency when you are a community leader and elected official representing the voice of the people who are suffering unthinkable pain and tragedy. Not when the people need someone to speak for them if nothing else to stomp your feet and demand those responsible to find a way to help.

Any other week, sure, gtfo, work remotely. But not this week. You kiss your family goodbye, wish them well, then drive back to whatever public office has power and get back to being a voice. You don't get to leave ground zero when you're a leader.
swordtail
Anarchist Prime
Fri Feb 19 07:29:47
http://pbs...XEAI4bVc?format=jpg&name=small
Sam Adams
Member
Fri Feb 19 10:40:14
"Outages lasting more than 3 days is a government responsibility to redress."

Any competent person should be able to fend for themselves for much much longer than 3 days.

A 3 day disruption is no where near the longest you might expect, especially with the supreme incompetence of modern woke government laid bare by covid and a host of other minor disruptions.

A month is the bare minimum. The great Montreal ice storm is a good analogy: it left a significant swath of southeastern Canada and a bit of the northeastern US without power for a month, and the roads ice-covered for a week. Government response was better too... back then jobs were more often filled based on ability rather than percieved oppression status. And still they failed.
patom
Member
Fri Feb 19 10:48:01
jergul
large member
Fri Feb 19 10:51:23
http://en...._1998_North_American_ice_storm

3 days is fine. After that, you can and should expect emergency assistance.

If you live in a developed country that is.
patom
Member
Fri Feb 19 10:51:56
Sam I take it you're talking the ice storm of 98. I remember it well. I was living in Calais at the time and driving tanker for Irving Oil. We only lost power intown for a few hours. Friends of ours lost it for 4 days and another couple that lived on the lake we had our camp on lost it for over a month. I still have pictures from that storm.
Sam Adams
Member
Fri Feb 19 11:36:18
Yup. Thats the one. I remember skiing in maine next winter many of the trees were still ripped up.

Nothing quite like freezing rain for causing chaos. In canada it dropped so much ice... 3 inches or so... it broke all those high tension lines.

You dont get this fixed in 3 days:
http://arc...photos/original/ice-quebec.jpg
jergul
large member
Fri Feb 19 12:38:30
That is not what I was saying either sammy.

I am saying that you need to support yourself independently for 3 days until emergency assistance can be set up or evacuation arranged.
Sam Adams
Member
Fri Feb 19 12:57:45
And i am saying government is not nearly competent enough for that 3 day claim. And that there are disasters out there... not even that rare... where a 3 day response time is beyond the ability of even well lead leadership.

We know an exceptional ice storm can do that, and a large hurricane or quake can as well. To that mix we can add true disasters like vei 7+ volcanos and possibly a large solar flare, in addition to incompetent governments starting the problem, through civil or nuclear war.
Sam Adams
Member
Fri Feb 19 12:59:26
And of course... dieseases.
patom
Member
Fri Feb 19 13:55:09
Another storm I remember from the 50's was a wet snow storm in April of 58. I was in HS then and this storm pulled down power lines all over SE Pennsylvania. The snow stuck to the power lines and were at least 6" thick. Parts of that area were without power for over a month. We were lucky in that we heated our house with a coal stove and cooked with natural gas. The good thing was it was April so it melted pretty fast but they were still repairing lines over a month later.
Paramount
Member
Fri Feb 19 13:59:32
” his decision to flee with his family as millions of others hunkered down in their dark, freezing homes — as the Texas death toll climbed past 20 people — admittedly does not look great! But please, Ted Cruz is begging you, do not blame him for this dereliction of duty: It was his daughters (ages 10 and 12) who wanted the vacation, and well, what was he going to do — simply say no??”

http://www...to-mexico-in-texas-crisis.html


So Cruz had to flee and cross a border to give his family a better life?
patom
Member
Fri Feb 19 14:00:31
I don't know why but I always remember that storm as being in April but here is some pics it was March 58
http://www...ab_channel=PublicDomainFootage
Sam Adams
Member
Fri Feb 19 14:18:44
"Another storm I remember from the 50's was a wet snow storm in April of 58."

That one was a bit before my time so i cant comment on the specifics but late season snows can cause a lot of trouble. They tend to be stickier and heavier and if the leaves are out the trees hold more and are much more vulnerable.
TJ
Member
Fri Feb 19 15:03:48
The blizzard of 1949. Talk about a tough situation. I'm still shivering just from watching.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gl6Iz4dXGdg

Kaylana
Moderator
Fri Feb 19 15:12:50
Actually more leaked text messages have revealed that the Cruz family weren't even going without power and water, and his daughters weren't asking to go to Cancun. He made all of that up.

They were staying a friend's house that had power and water because the power had been shut down. Heidi Cruz's text even explain that, it was her idea to go to Cancun and they're just "stopping by" their own home to get suitcases packed, because there was a flight available that afternoon (4:45 pm central).

She goes on to explain that they weren't at home because it was too cold so they were with a friend who had electricity.

So 1) they weren't even cold or sacrificing anything, meaning

1b) they were literally just bored and wanted to go on a trip; and

2) The daughters didn't beg daddy to take them to Cancun, his wife came up with that brilliant plan, which means he blatantly lied and threw his daughters under the bus for it, making them look spoiled rotten.

Big conclusion? There was no ethical reason for him to leave.
Kaylana
Moderator
Fri Feb 19 15:14:22
They were staying at a friend's house that had power and water because their power had been shut down.*
Y2A
Member
Fri Feb 19 16:23:39
father of the year

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gplpSfaouP8
Average Ameriacn
Member
Fri Feb 19 18:19:39
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://pbs...cAQHIqg?format=jpg&name=medium
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